Playing Video Games Improve Doctors’ Surgical Skills

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Doctor playing video games with joystick
Playing video games improves doctor's recognition and triage of severe trauma patients | Image Source: ReachMD

Doctors playing video games can easily carry out laparoscopic surgical procedure. A study conducted in 2003 shows that playing video games not less than three hours per week, gaming doctors have greater hand-eye coordination which is useful when doing surgery. The study showed that gamer surgeons made 37 per cent fewer errors and worked 27 per cent quicker than those who do not play video games.

Laparoscopy is a medical procedure which entails inserting a tiny digital camera right into an affected person’s physique by means of a small incision. Doctors playing video games are found efficient in this procedure. These gaming surgeons have higher coordination in the event that they play video video games not less than three hours per week.

Gaming surgeons who spent many hours playing video games as kids make fewer errors on the working desk, based on a surgeon who has researched the problem.

Doctor playing video games with joystick
Playing video games improves doctor’s recognition and triage of severe trauma patients | Image Source: ReachMD

“I take advantage of the identical hand-eye coordination to play video video games as I take advantage of for surgical procedure,” mentioned James Rosser, M.D., who demonstrated the outcomes of his research earlier this month at Beth Israel Medical Heart, New York.

Rosser, 49, mentioned the talent wanted for laparoscopic surgery – using a tiny digital camera and devices managed by joysticks outdoors the body-is “like tying your shoelaces with 3-foot-long chopsticks.”

Rosser’s research on whether or not good video-game expertise translates into surgical prowess was based mostly on testing 33 fellow doctors-12 attending physicians and 21 medical college residents who participated from May to August 2003. Every physician accomplished three video-game duties that examined such components as hand-eye coordination, motor expertise and response time.

Docs who had spent not less than three hours every week enjoying video games make 37% fewer errors in laparoscopy and carry out the duty 27% quicker than their counterparts who did not play video video games, based on researchers with Beth Israel and the Nationwide Institute on Media and the Household at Iowa State College.

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